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Explore this lovely corner of north-west England, and you’ll discover a wealth of history, architecture, art and quaint old fishing villages. Book your stay at The Longlands Inn or in one of our luxury holiday cottages today and start looking forward to the delights you’ll find here.
Enjoy a stroll along the seafront at Morecambe and experience miles of art that you can’t help but interact with. Whether you play hopscotch on the stone jetty or follow the amazing ‘flock of words’ – with pieces from Genesis to Spike Milligan. Known as the Tern Project, the art has all been inspired by the wide range of birds that shelter in the Bay.

Commissioned in 1994 as part of the regeneration and coastal protection programme, it shows just what great things can result from collaboration between creative and technical types.
Once one of the most popular theatres in the country, The Winter Gardens is currently actively raising funds for renovation. In the 30s and 40s, it was the opening venue for many West End shows and Britain’s finest including George Formby, Laurel and Hardy, and, of course, Morecambe and Wise performed here. As part of the fundraising campaign, occasional performances now take place with audiences advised to bring blankets in the winter to huddle under. Although it is only a ghost of the place it once was, it is open on Sundays during the season and it is an incredibly atmospheric place to wander around.
Morecambe’s heyday was in the early part of the last century with investment being poured in during the 1930s, the lucky result being the Art Deco influence to the architecture. Look above the shop fronts as you walk around and you will see countless examples. If you’re a real fan, the art deco walks show you the examples you might otherwise miss right down to the art deco ‘public conveniences.’
Poulton is the original fishing village that existed long before the birth of Morecambe. Currently the focus of a regeneration campaign, it is a quaint place to wander around with dramatic murals based on a fishing theme that have been created in a project between local artists and the community.
Visible for miles around, the Ashton Memorial is often referred to as the ‘Tahj Mahal of the North.’ Lancaster’s Victorian benefactor, Lord Ashton, as a tribute to his wife Jessie, commissioned it. From the viewing gallery, you can enjoy a panoramic view of Lancaster, Morecambe and the Lakeland Hills.

The Memorial hosts exhibitions and during the summer and there is an outstanding programme of outdoor theatre and concerts. With woodland walks and shady dells, the 54-acre park is a peaceful place to wander in and it’s always worth taking a pit stop to sample the homemade cakes in the café, next to the Butterfly House.
Dating back to the 12th century, Lancaster Castle has played a rather gruesome part in British history. Find out about witches, terrorists, handless corpses and lots of hangings. See countless torture instruments, be locked in the dungeons, and visit the drop room with its doorway to Hanging Corner.
Appropriately housed in the old customs’ house on Lancaster’s quayside, the award winning Maritime Museum celebrates the port’s illustrious past, as well as the fishing industry of Morecambe. It houses four restored fishing vessels and even extends to sounds and smells! The café is also well worth a visit.
An absolute gem of a theatre and independent cinema – the sort of place where you can enjoy a good glass of wine with your film. The Dukes are also the people who put on the Theatre in the Park (see Williamson Park).
A good stop-off for book and film lovers. The railway station was immortalised in “Brief Encounter” and you can enjoy a romantic tryst in the buffet. Then lose yourself in the second hand and antiquarian bookshop, one of the UK’s largest.
On the campus of Lancaster University are The Nuffield Theatre and The Peter Scott Gallery. With an ever-changing programme of performances, exhibitions and concerts, it is often a good place to spend an enlightening evening.
Bijou boutique shopping. Listed buildings house arts, crafts, clothing, delis and antique shops. Refresh and recharge in one of the many inns or tearooms and don’t miss the aforementioned Ruskin’s View overlooking the River Lune or the medieval Devil's Bridge.
Opened in 1799, the Lancaster canal played a vital role in Lancaster’s success as a mill town. Now it is a tranquil waterway, perfect for walking or cycling. In the summer months, a waterbus runs from Lancaster to Carnforth, even offering fish and chip or hotpot cruises, in the evenings, a true taste of Lancashire.
Aficionados will enjoy Levens Hall, a beautiful Grade I manor house with world-famous gardens, Sizergh Castle with its impressive limestone rock garden, Leighton Hall, the historic home of the world-renowned Gillow furniture family and the imposing Holker Hall, where you’ll find the Great Holker Lime tree, measuring nearly 8m in girth.
ronnie the dog on one of his walks along the canal
a pretty picture of a walk at leighton hall

VISIT STATELY HOMES, INTERACTIVE ART, LIVELY THEATRES & FASCINATING MUSEUMS WHEN YOU STAY AT THE LONGLANDS INN

ART BY THE SEA

THE WINTER GARDENS IN MORECAMBE

ART DECO ARCHITECTURE

POULTON

THE ASHTON MEMORIAL AND WILLIAMSON'S PARK

LANCASTER CASTLE

THE MARITIME MUSEUM, LANCASTER

THE DUKE'S THEATRE, LANCASTER

CARNFORTH

ART & THEATRE AT LANCASTER UNIVERSITY

KIRKBY LONSDALE

FISH & CHIP CRUISES

STATELY HOME HOPPING

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